Fool's online sale Quest: Book II of online sale the Fitz and the Fool trilogy outlet sale

Fool's online sale Quest: Book II of online sale the Fitz and the Fool trilogy outlet sale

Fool's online sale Quest: Book II of online sale the Fitz and the Fool trilogy outlet sale

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BUZZFEED AND THE INDEPENDENT • Ranking alongside George R. R. Martin as a groundbreaking master of fantasy, Robin Hobb delivers the second book in her long-awaited Fitz and the Fool trilogy.

The harrowing adventures of FitzChivalry Farseer and his enigmatic friend the Fool continue in Robin Hobb’s triumphant follow-up to Fool’s Assassin. But Fool’s Quest is more than just a sequel. With the artistry and imagination her fans have come to expect, Hobb builds masterfully on all that has gone before, revealing devastating secrets and shocking conspiracies that cast a dark shadow over the history of Fitz and his world—a shadow that now stretches to darken all future hope.

Long ago, Fitz and the Fool changed the world, bringing back the magic of dragons and securing both the Farseer succession and the stability of the kingdom. Or so they thought. But now the Fool is near death, maimed by mysterious pale-skinned figures whose plans for world domination hinge upon the powers the Fool may share with Fitz’s own daughter. 

Distracted by the Fool’s perilous health, and swept up against his will in the intrigues of the royal court, Fitz lets down his guard . . . and in a horrible instant, his world is undone and his beloved daughter stolen away by those who would use her as they had once sought to use the Fool—as a weapon.

But FitzChivalry Farseer is not without weapons of his own. An ancient magic still lives in his veins. And though he may have let his skills as royal assassin diminish over the years, such things, once learned, are not so easily forgotten.

Now enemies and friends alike are about to learn that nothing is more dangerous than a man who has nothing left to lose.

Praise for Fool’s Quest

“A complex tapestry of adventure, betrayal, destiny, and unrelenting peril . . . Hobb’s expertise is evident as always.”Publishers Weekly

“Glorious and beautiful storytelling . . . Hobb lets rip with revelations, treachery, vengeance, sword fights and full on magical mayhem.”SciFiNow

“If readers have any doubt that Robin Hobb is one of the finest writers in the fantasy genre, then they haven’t read any of her work.”—SFFWorld

Review

“A complex tapestry of adventure, betrayal, destiny, and unrelenting peril . . . [Robin] Hobb’s expertise is evident as always.”Publishers Weekly
 
“Glorious and beautiful storytelling . . . Hobb lets rip with revelations, treachery, vengeance, sword fights and full on magical mayhem.”SciFiNow
 
“If readers have any doubt that Robin Hobb is one of the finest writers in the fantasy genre, then they haven’t read any of her work.”—SFFWorld

“Hobb finds a way to always show us more details of the universe she’s been building over the course of the four previous series. . . . The friendship of Fitz and the Fool brings danger to them both, but it’s one of the most touching in fantasy fiction.”Library Journal (starred review)

Praise for Robin Hobb and Fool’s Assassin

“Fantasy as it ought to be written.”—George R. R. Martin

“Hobb knows the complicated workings of the wayward human heart, and she takes time to depict them in her tale, to tell her story sweetly, insistently, compellingly. . . . A book meant to be inhabited rather than run through.”The Seattle Times

“[FitzChivalry Farseer is] one of the best characters in fantasy literature.”Fantasy Book Review

“[Hobb’s] prose sparkles, her characters leap off the page.”Tordotcom

“Modern fantasy at its irresistible best.”—The Guardian

“Fantastic . . . emotionally rich storytelling.”—Library Journal (starred review)

About the Author

Robin Hobb is the author of the Farseer Trilogy, the Liveship Traders Trilogy, the Tawny Man Trilogy, the Soldier Son Trilogy, and the Rain Wilds Chronicles. She has also written as Megan Lindholm. She is a native of Washington State.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Winterfest Eve at Buckkeep

I am warm and safe in the den, with my two siblings. They are both heartier and stronger than I am. Born last, I am smallest of all. My eyes were slow to open, and I have been the least adventurous of the cubs. Both my brother and my sister have dared, more than once, to follow my mother to the mouth of the den dug deep in the undercut bank of the river. Each time, she has snarled and snapped at them, driving them back. She leaves us alone when she goes out to hunt. There should be a wolf to watch over us, a younger member of the pack who remains with us. But my mother is all that is left of the pack, and so she must go out to hunt alone and we must stay where she leaves us.

There is a day when she shakes free of us, long before we have had enough of her milk. She leaves us, going to the hunt, departing the den as evening starts to creep across the land. We hear from her a single yelp. That is all.

My brother, the largest of us, is filled with both fear and curiosity. He whines loudly, trying to call her back to us, but there is no response. He starts to go to the entrance of the den and my sister follows him, but in a moment they come scrabbling back to hunker down in fear beside me. There are strange smells right outside the den, bad smells, blood and creatures unknown to us. As we hide and whimper, the blood-­smell grows stronger. We do the only thing we know to do. We hunch and huddle against the far back wall.

We hear sounds. Something that is not paws digs at the mouth of our den. It sounds like a large tooth biting into the earth, biting and tearing, biting and tearing. We hunch even deeper and my brother’s hackles rise. We hear sounds and we know there is more than one creature outside. The blood-­smell thickens and is mingled with the smell of our mother. The digging noises go on.

Then there is another smell. In years to come I will know what it is, but in the dream it is not smoke. It is a smell that none of us understands, and it comes in driven wafts into the den. We cry, for it stings our eyes and sucks the breath from our lungs. The den becomes hot and airless and finally my brother crawls toward the opening. We hear his wild yelping, and how it continues, and then there is the stink of fear-­piss. My sister huddles behind me, getting smaller and stiller. And then she is not breathing or hiding anymore. She is dead.

I sink down, my paws over my nose, my eyes blinded by the smoke. The digging noises go on and then something seizes me. I yelp and struggle, but it holds tight to my front leg and drags me from the den.

My mother is a hide and a bloody red carcass thrown to one side. My brother huddles in terror at the bottom of a cage in the back of a two-­wheeled cart. They fling me in beside him and then drag out my sister’s body. They are angry she is dead, and they kick her as if somehow their anger can make her feel pain now. Then, complaining of the cold and oncoming dark, they skin her and add her small hide to my mother’s. The two men climb onto the cart and whip up their mule, already speculating at the prices that wolf cubs will bring from the dog-­fighting markets. My mother’s and sister’s bloody hides fill my nose with the stench of death.

It is only the beginning of a torment that lasts for a lifetime. Some days we are fed and sometimes not. We are given no shelter from the rain. The only warmth is that of our own bodies as we huddle together. My brother, thin with worms, dies in a pit, thrown in to whet the ferocity of the fighting dogs. And then I am alone. They feed me offal and scraps or nothing at all. My feet become sore from pawing at the cage, my claws split and my muscles ache from confinement. They beat me and poke me to provoke me to hurl myself against bars I cannot break. They speak outside my cage of their plans to sell me for the fighting-­pits. I hear the words but I do not understand them.

I did understand the words. I spasmed awake, and for a moment everything was wrong, everything was foreign. I was huddled in a ball, shuddering, and my fur had been stripped away to bare skin and my legs were bent at the wrong angles and confined by something. My senses were as deadened as if I were wadded in a sack. All around me were the smells of those hated creatures. I bared my teeth and, snarling, fought my way out of my bonds.

Even after I landed on the floor, the blanket trailing after me and my body asserting that I was, indeed, one of those hated humans, I stared in confusion around the dark room. It felt as if it should be morning, but the floor beneath me was not the smooth oaken planks of my bedchamber, nor did the room smell as if it belonged to me. I came slowly to my feet, my eyes striving to adjust. My straining vision caught the blinking of tiny red eyes, and then translated them to the dying embers of a fire. In a fireplace.

As I felt my way across the chamber, the world fell into place around me. Chade’s old rooms at Buckkeep Castle emerged from the blackness when I poked at the embers and added a few sticks of wood. Numbly, I found fresh candles and kindled them, waking the room to its perpetual twilight. I looked around, letting my life catch up with me. I judged that the night had passed and that outside the thick and windowless walls, day had dawned. The dire events of the previous day—­how I had nearly killed the Fool, left my child in the charge of folk I did not fully trust, and then dangerously drained Riddle of Skill-­strength to bring the Fool to Buckkeep—­rushed over me in a sweeping tide. They met the engulfing memories of all the evenings and nights I’d spent in this windowless chamber, learning the skills and secrets of being the king’s assassin. When finally the sticks caught flame, enriching the thin candlelight in the room, I felt as if I had made a long journey to return to myself. The wolf’s dream of his horrific captivity was fading. I wondered briefly why it had come back with such intensity, and then let it go. Nighteyes, my wolf, my brother, was long gone from this world. The echoes of him lived on in my mind, my heart, and my memories, but in what I faced now, he was no longer at my back. I stood alone.

Except for the Fool. My friend had returned to me. Battered, beaten, and possibly not in his right mind, but at my side again. I held a candle high and ventured back to the bed we had shared.

The Fool was still deeply asleep. He looked terrible. The marks of torture were written on his scarred face; hardship and starvation had chapped and chafed his skin and thinned his hair to broken straw. Even so, he looked better than when first I had seen him. He was clean and fed and warm. And his even breathing was that of a man given a fresh infusion of strength. I wished I could say I had given it to him. All unwitting, I had stolen strength from Riddle and passed it to my friend during our Skill-­passage through the standing stones. I regretted how I had abused Riddle in my ignorance but I could not deny the relief I felt to hear the Fool’s steady breathing. Last night he had had the strength to talk with me and he had walked a bit, bathed himself, and eaten a meal. That was far more than I would have expected of the battered beggar I had first seen.

But borrowed strength is not true strength. The hasty Skill-­healing I’d practiced had robbed him of his scanty physical reserves, and the vitality I had stolen from Riddle could not long sustain the Fool. I hoped the food and rest he had taken yesterday had begun to rebuild his body. I watched him sleeping so deeply and dared to hope he would live. Moving softly, I picked up the bedding I had dragged to the floor in my fall and arranged it warmly around him.

He was so changed. He had been a man who loved beauty in all its forms. His tailored garments, the ornaments in his chambers, the hangings for his bed and windows, even the tie that had held back his immaculately groomed hair had all been chosen with harmony and fashion in mind. But that man was gone. He had come back to me as a ragbag scarecrow. The flesh of his face had fallen to skin-­coated bones. Battered, blinded, wearing the scars of torture, the Fool had been so transformed by hardship that I hadn’t recognized him. Gone was the lithe and limber jester with the mocking smile. Gone, too, elegant Lord Golden with his fine clothes and aristocratic ways. I was left with this cadaverous wretch.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
2,939 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

monesqe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Back in form, excited again
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2019
When I read Book 1, I had mixed feelings. It was great to see old friends on a new adventure, but the book was overlong and its plot line was too modest for a book that long. I.e., nothing much happened. It was a fairly simple setup for the next two books--and it took... See more
When I read Book 1, I had mixed feelings. It was great to see old friends on a new adventure, but the book was overlong and its plot line was too modest for a book that long. I.e., nothing much happened. It was a fairly simple setup for the next two books--and it took hundreds and hundreds of pages to get there. What happened? (Spoilers, but these are pretty obvious and since this is on a Book 2 review....) Molly dies. Bee is taken, hints of the Fool occur. At half the length, it could have been as good. At two-thirds, maybe fine. But as it was, it dragged too often. I never felt like skimming a Robin Hobb book before, but I was close. The familiar and excellent prose style was there, the great characters, the world building--but it seemed like the plot line got lost and became an afterthought. It became a little tedious--not normally my reaction to a Robin Hobb book.

Here, all that is rectified. World building, skill with prose and characters all remain great. However, now there''s actually a plot that moves and moves in a direction. The pages turn. There are episodes of detail--but now it feels like fleshing out scenes for a great plot rather than an end unto itself. It''s exciting again. I couldn''t put it down. I''m about half way through Book 3, and just as psyched.
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KatPiper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Totally Blew Me Away!
Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2018
I am totally blown away by Robin Hobb''s writing! She has created a total world filled with the most fascinating characters--humans and elderlings and dragons, kings and queens and princes... and magic. Especially magic. Such incredible magical powers! Reading these books, I... See more
I am totally blown away by Robin Hobb''s writing! She has created a total world filled with the most fascinating characters--humans and elderlings and dragons, kings and queens and princes... and magic. Especially magic. Such incredible magical powers! Reading these books, I travel to the most fantastic places and meet the most fascinating characters. I can only describe the experience as transformative and powerful and oh, so addicting.

In this, the second book of the Fitz and the Fool trilogy, we find our hero, Fitz, back in Buckkeep Castle, as he tries to nurse the Fool back to health after having been tortured by the Servants, a mysterious group who have colluded with the evil Chalcedeans to capture the singular person whose dreams can foretell he future. They have determined that Bee, the young daughter of Fitz and the now deceased Molly, is the "unacknowledged son" they seek. (Why they think Bee is a boy, I do not yet know. But genders do tend to merge and change in some characters of this series.) We readers share the abject devastation, anger and desire for revenge that Fitz and the rest of the Farseer royalty feel when they discover the destruction of Withywoods, the slaughter of most of that household and especially the abduction of Bee and her cousin, Shun.

The perilous adventure that Fitz embarks upon to revenge what he believes to be Bee''s death is absolutely riveting, especially when he is joined by the Fool and a small, but mainly untrained entourage. I was spellbound right up to the thrilling but frightening cliffhanger at the end of the book.

I may be reading too much into the storyline, but I definitely felt there were some Christian overtones here, which I quite enjoyed. For example, when "wolf father" speaks to warn Bee, it seems like the voice of the Holy Spirit, or perhaps a guardian angel. And when Fitz is filled with the Skill stream (again, Holy Spirit?) and is able to heal the young elderling prince, and then he is mobbed by a large group of elderlings begging to be healed, much like the stories of Jesus'' healings in the Gospels. And when the demands of the crowd become too excessive, Fitz is physically and mentally overwhelmed, reminiscent of a scene in Andrew Lloyd Weber''s "Jesus Christ Superstar". But I digress.

I am eagerly anticipating reading the third book of this series. That particular pleasure will have to wait a few weeks while I try to catch up on my book club reading. I can''t help but wonder, though, why there hasn''t been a series of feature length movies based on these stories. What an amazing blockbuster that would (will?) be! It could rival or even surpass Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter combined. Oh, the po$$ibilitie$...
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Kriti Godey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I can''t not love a Fitz book
Reviewed in the United States on May 21, 2016
As expected, I loved this book. It’s hard to talk about all the things Robin Hobb does right, especially because at this point, I expect her to do them right, so this is going to be a pretty short review. Spoilers for Fool’s Assassin ensue. We pick up... See more
As expected, I loved this book. It’s hard to talk about all the things Robin Hobb does right, especially because at this point, I expect her to do them right, so this is going to be a pretty short review.

Spoilers for Fool’s Assassin ensue.

We pick up right where we ended things in Fool’s Assassin, and the pacing of the first half of the book is really slow. This was a bit irritating from the plot perspective considering the cliffhanger at the end of the last book, but Hobb doesn’t waste a single word. Fitz’s usual stubbornness is tempered by a little bit of wisdom, but he’s still very much himself. The Fool’s is not really himself, which is very unpleasant to read about, but makes sense. Bee is not as much of a presence in this book, but she’s a welcome one when she does show up. There are great new characters like Ash, great old characters that I never thought I’d see again, and welcome character development for characters from the first book.

There are a few moments involving Fitz in this book that I never really expected to happen, and some loose ends from the original Farseer trilogy are wrapped up. The last few chapters of the book are especially exciting for those of us who love the whole Realm of the Elderlings universe. All these good things make me scared for Fitz’s fate in the third book (especially as the book is called Asssassin’s Fate, and Robin Hobb doesn’t have a history of leaving her characters happy) but otherwise, I was thrilled.

I really don’t want to wait until this time next year to find out what happens next.
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Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Meat-headed Fitz refuses to cooperate.
Reviewed in the United States on January 6, 2017
I''ve been voraciously devouring this trilogy. The books can be frustrating at times particularly this one because it delays so much. I want to find out what happens with Bee but instead get pages upon pages about food, clothing, baths, and Fitz''s meat-headed inability to... See more
I''ve been voraciously devouring this trilogy. The books can be frustrating at times particularly this one because it delays so much. I want to find out what happens with Bee but instead get pages upon pages about food, clothing, baths, and Fitz''s meat-headed inability to cooperate with his family and friends. I almost set it asside as once again he refused to plan or to cooperate with them. Sigh. That''s Fitz. On to the next in the series.
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E.P. Clark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Gripping Continuation of the Trilogy
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2018
"Fool''s Quest" starts right where "Fool''s Assassin" ends, so you''ll want to read book 1 in the trilogy first. As I mentioned in my review of the first book, the trilogy is not so much three separate books as one giant book split into three parts, so, while of course you... See more
"Fool''s Quest" starts right where "Fool''s Assassin" ends, so you''ll want to read book 1 in the trilogy first. As I mentioned in my review of the first book, the trilogy is not so much three separate books as one giant book split into three parts, so, while of course you could jump in here in the middle, and if you''ve stumbled upon this book and are wondering whether to read it, the answer is a giant YES, I would recommend if at all possible reading them in order.

Like the first book, "Fool''s Quest" is a giant, sprawling, epic fantasy monster of a novel. A considerable portion of the book is narrated from Bee''s point of view, which adds a delightful freshness to it, and also builds the tension almost unbearably. Hobb tells the story from Bee''s perspective for just long enough for things to get really desperate, and then jumps back to Fitz''s point of view, often jumping around in time as well as space. The technique could be fragmented and incoherent, but it''s not, mainly because there''s so much narrative tension throughout the story that you''ll be on the edge of your seat the entire time.

As with the first book in the trilogy, if you hate huge epic fantasy series and cliffhanger endings, you''ll probably want to steer clear. But if you *love* that kind of stuff like I do, then you need to snap this up ASAP. Of course, if you''ve already read the first book, you''ll be so desperate to continue you won''t need me to tell you.
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IHS
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Finally!
Reviewed in the United States on July 26, 2016
I admit I might be a bit (a lot) biased about this book. Farseer is one of my favorite fantasy series ever. I understand some people thinking this book a bit slow, in some way I agree. Still, I just love it. I think this was a step up from the first book in the Fitz and the... See more
I admit I might be a bit (a lot) biased about this book. Farseer is one of my favorite fantasy series ever. I understand some people thinking this book a bit slow, in some way I agree. Still, I just love it. I think this was a step up from the first book in the Fitz and the fool series (Although I really liked the first as well). It is more going on, and we are starting to see the outline of the full story. I would not recommend this book if you have not red the previous installments. I guess it could work as a standalone series, but I think what made me love it so much is that I really feel like I know the characters from before. Hobbs writing and characters are really good, as always, and also she is writing loooooong books. So they will not end right away. Already preordered the next book!
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Chitalu Andrew KabalikaTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Most Impressive Midquel
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2019
After the heart rending conclusion of Fool''s Assassin, I found the first third of Fool''s Quest almost unbearable! I was looking for closure and that made it difficult to enjoy all the plot developments and character interactions that are Hoff''s strong point.... See more
After the heart rending conclusion of Fool''s Assassin, I found the first third of Fool''s Quest almost unbearable! I was looking for closure and that made it difficult to enjoy all the plot developments and character interactions that are Hoff''s strong point.

However, I mellowed out and began to enjoy the book the slow development and build up. I loved the development of long standing plot threads and the revelations of mysteries established in the prior book.

After having had time to digest the cliffhanger of the previous book and taking into account this one, I can say I enjoyed both books very much.

Looking forward to the conclusion anf I can now recommended the final trilogy in good conscience!
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The Housework Can Wait
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fitz and The Fool remain two of the greatest characters I''ve ever read
Reviewed in the United States on September 9, 2015
I can’t tell you how excited I was when I found out Robin Hobb was writing a new series about Fitz and the Fool. While we left both characters in a pretty satisfying place at the end of FOOL’S FATE, I’d come to love these characters like family. I missed not being able to... See more
I can’t tell you how excited I was when I found out Robin Hobb was writing a new series about Fitz and the Fool. While we left both characters in a pretty satisfying place at the end of FOOL’S FATE, I’d come to love these characters like family. I missed not being able to journey alongside them on their adventures. So although I had no idea what to expect as far as a conflict for a new series — the main conflict in both the Assassin and Tawny Man series is pretty handily wrapped up at the end of FOOL’S FATE — I was eager to return to the world of the Six Duchies.

Like the first books in most of Hobb’s preceding series, the initial installment in the Fitz and the Fool trilogy, FOOL’S ASSASSIN, takes its time ramping up. I very much enjoyed it — by this point in the series, my overwhelming fondness for FitzChivalry Farseer means that I’m totally cool following him through a series of quiet and mundane tasks, whether it’s managing his estate or dealing with his children (mostly because Fitz has gone through so many dark times that I’m beyond pleased that he has an estate, or children) — and this sort of slow grounding process is necessary to re-establish the reader in Fitz’s world and remind us of the events that led here — but as far as action goes, it’s not until the final act of FOOL’S ASSASSIN that we really see things take off.

Not so with FOOL’S QUEST. Again, this is pretty well expected for each of Hobb’s series: Book 1 spends its time meticulously setting up an intricate pattern of dominoes, then Book 2 blazes in and knocks them all down, leaving the reader in a mess of perfectly executed chaos. FOOL’S QUEST was no exception to this. It hits the ground running, picking up right where FOOL’S ASSASSIN leaves off, and pushes the plot forward at a determined pace, never feeling rushed, but never letting up, either. High fantasy tends to run long in pages, but while reading FOOL’S QUEST, I found myself lamenting that there were *only* 500, 400, 300 pages left to go.

You know that feeling when watching the extended edition of The Two Towers, and it ends and you simultaneously realize, “wow, that movie was three and a half hours long,” but also wish it didn’t have to end? That’s the feeling I had reading this book. Though I was aware of its heft, when I turned the last page, I wasn’t anywhere near ready for it to be over.

Unlike FOOL’S ASSASSIN, which focuses almost entirely on Fitz and his life far away from Buckkeep Castle, FOOL’S QUEST returns him to his old stomping grounds, where we finally get to catch up with beloved (and Beloved) characters of the past. The Fool is there, of course (I was surprised at how little The Fool was in the first book, given its name), just as mysterious and tragic as ever, along with Chade, Kettricken, Dutiful, Elliania, Nettle, and a host of minor characters whose inclusion made it feel like a true homecoming not just for Fitz, but for the reader. There are even some cameos from characters from the Liveships and Rain Wilds books, whom I hope we see more of as the story progresses.

Although this series of series has always tied together beautifully, to me it’s always felt kind of like a quilt, with clearly distinct pieces coming together at the edges and making up a whole. The Fitz books overlapped with Liveships, which overlapped with Rain Wilds, but they were all still their own separate entities. But in FOOL’S QUEST, for the first time, it began to feel more like a tapestry, with the threads beginning to weave over and under and through one another. It’s possible this won’t come to fruition, and that this Fitz series, like the other (brilliant) books before it, will end up more or less self-contained. But I kind of doubt it, and look forward to seeing how Hobb continues to tie this massive world and cast together.

As with every one of Hobb’s preceding books, in FOOL’S QUEST you can expect a host of fully realized, complicated characters, lush worldbuilding, achingly gorgeous prose, vivid emotion, catastrophic stakes, and thrilling action. But for me, the relationships between the characters are what shine the brightest. Fitz’s friendship with The Fool is, of course, the Catalyst on which the whole story pivots, and always has been. Watching these two characters who have been through so much together interact and trust and plead and betray and forgive is a truly beautiful, frustrating, heartbreaking, uplifting experience.

Contrasting that is Fitz’s relationships with his daughters, where he is not a Catalyst, but simply a father, with all the expectation and disappointment and responsibility that brings. Watching Fitz try to navigate fatherhood, after watching him grow up and struggle and fail and triumph, is both rewarding and agonizing. I want nothing but the best for Fitz, but both fate and his own shortcomings are constantly getting in his way. I want to take him by the shoulders and shake him and hug him, maybe at the same time, which for my money is one of the hallmarks of a truly excellent protagonist.

I could go on for ages, but suffice it to say, all of Fitz’s other relationships are similarly complex and well-drawn. Each feels like fully realized person, and the way Fitz interacts with each person he encounters is wholly authentic and honest, whether he’s fighting to the death or gently caring for a traumatized stable hand. Though the sweeping plot of FOOL’S QUEST is every bit as intriguing and suspenseful as Fitz’s quest to aid King Verity against the Red Ships Raiders, or traveling to Aslevjal island to slay a dragon, it’s these relationships and interactions that are the true meat of this series.

Ultimately, this isn’t a recommendation for this one book — if you’ve already read the preceding 7-14 books, you probably already have a pretty good idea if you want to read this one — but for this series, and every series about FitzChivalry Farseer. If you’re not sure if fantasy is your thing, or you’re hesitant about picking up the first book in a series that is so sprawling, let this be your assurance that this is a series that only gets better as it continues. It’s worth the time, it’s worth the investment. Fitz and The Fool are two of the greatest characters I’ve ever read, and as long as Robin Hobb sees fit to keep writing books about them, I’ll be the first in line to read them.
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Top reviews from other countries

A. Sohanpal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunning
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 14, 2015
I have loved this story since I first started reading of Fitz and his adventures as a boy barely into his teens. I thoroughly enjoyed Fool''s Assassin, but was a bit concerned by the pacing of the story - in short, I was worried about where the story was heading. My fears...See more
I have loved this story since I first started reading of Fitz and his adventures as a boy barely into his teens. I thoroughly enjoyed Fool''s Assassin, but was a bit concerned by the pacing of the story - in short, I was worried about where the story was heading. My fears were groundless. This second installment of The Fitz and The Fool picks up the pace of the narrative, which takes the reader on an incredible journey that is very reminiscent of Hobb''s earlier works. One always approaches later works with trepidation, fearing that time will have eroded the quality of a beloved story - not so with this book. All I can say is - if you have read what came before, then clear your schedule for a few days and pick up where you left off! And if you''re a fantasy-reader who is yet to read any of Hobb''s work, go back to Assassin''s Apprentice and work your way up to Fool''s Quest. Your time will not have been wasted!
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Barry Mulvany
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another amazing chapter in the Realm of the Elderlings saga
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 15, 2018
Another amazing chapter in the Realm of the Elderlings saga. This book is much faster paced than the previous one but still manages to pack the emotional punch. I think this entry has one of my favorite moments (maybe two) in the whole series, those moments when I''ll be in...See more
Another amazing chapter in the Realm of the Elderlings saga. This book is much faster paced than the previous one but still manages to pack the emotional punch. I think this entry has one of my favorite moments (maybe two) in the whole series, those moments when I''ll be in that wonderful anticipation mode during re-reads. Of course these moments don''t last and Fitz gets emotionally beaten up all over again. And the Fool, he is not what he once was and it is not pleasant to see but still it is great to see him again and the relationship between the two. Towards the end it also opens up and we start to see links to the other series and that is brilliant and I''m looking forward to more of that in the last book. On that, I know this is series is not going to end well for Fitz or the Fool, it''s been fairly obvious from around mid-point of the first book, I hope I''m wrong but I doubt it. Anyway, let''s roll on to the emotional roller-coaster of the final book.
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Pam.Chohole
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very enjoyable trilogy, nice to visit the Rain Wilds and The 6 duchies again
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 20, 2018
So nice to have some more from this Author and for me it was so nice, after struggling with one or two of the abysmal books from the Game ot Thrones series, to pick up a book by Robin and read her superb flowing writing style. She draws you into her world as she is writing...See more
So nice to have some more from this Author and for me it was so nice, after struggling with one or two of the abysmal books from the Game ot Thrones series, to pick up a book by Robin and read her superb flowing writing style. She draws you into her world as she is writing about it and you can get really involved with her characters as she explains them so clearly. And as always there is just that hint of a cliffhanger at the end of the third book of the trilogy, so fans can still wait to see if she will find enough for another book or 3.
2 people found this helpful
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Hugh
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 28, 2016
Fool''s quest is book two of the Fitz and the Fool series and book fifteen (!) in the realm of the elderlings universe. If you''ve come this far as a reader then you know what to expect with Robin Hobb. The prose, characterisation, world building, dialogue and plot are simply...See more
Fool''s quest is book two of the Fitz and the Fool series and book fifteen (!) in the realm of the elderlings universe. If you''ve come this far as a reader then you know what to expect with Robin Hobb. The prose, characterisation, world building, dialogue and plot are simply astonishing. For me, Robin Hobb is the best writer out there, it''s all so intricate and subtle yet incredibly easy and enjoyable to read. I really care about these characters; they are so alive, flawed and complex and Hobb is a genius at making you worry and fret about them. All that said, the first two thirds of the book are very slow and not a lot happens; the story doesn''t progress that much. Hobb''s pacing has always been deliberately glacial but it''s more apparent here. Luckily, having Fitz interact with everyone is great and there are a few new characters to enjoy as well. Fitz - as usual - is very pensive. Now, whilst it''s very realistic to go over the same incidents and problems in your head, in the book it becomes a touch repetitive. As with the previous book, first person narration is shared between Fitz and his daughter Bee so that freshens the story up and progresses it a little. That said, Bee is a very irritating and smug person in my opinion so thankfully the other characters currently with her made those sections bearable. The final third of the book is a delight. The pacing is better and the quest really begins. I think in this book all of the stories from the previous books and the main plot in this trilogy, begin to coalesce and that is joy to see as a fan. Having Fitz interact with some of the main protagonists from the earlier books was fantastic and it highlights the strength in depth Hobb has regarding characters, places and plot lines. I can''t wait to read book three and to see how it all ends. 8/10
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Joadka
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Futz and the Fool
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 11, 2020
I stumbled across the Farseer trilogy by happenstance, and at the end of the first book, I was hooked. I really enjoyed the history of our illegitimate hero Fitz,, from age six years and his royal ancestors. At the end of the three books, it was inevitable that I read Fitz...See more
I stumbled across the Farseer trilogy by happenstance, and at the end of the first book, I was hooked. I really enjoyed the history of our illegitimate hero Fitz,, from age six years and his royal ancestors. At the end of the three books, it was inevitable that I read Fitz and the Fool series. Then I was really into the Fool, and Molly. This isn’t Game of Thrones, but it’s up there on the same level, with its created believable world of magic and strange creatures, full of characters that you really root for. Definitely read it.
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